President Trump Signs Great American Outdoors Act into Law

Today is a Historic Day for the American sportsman. President Donald Trump has signed the Great American Outdoors Act, codifying into permanent federal law enhanced conservation and freer access to public lands and waters today – and for generations to come. Thank you, President Trump!

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Apple Fire – San Bernardino National Forest

According to InciWeb, the Apple Fire has burned more than 26,000 acres, with about 5% containment. The fire is burning in, basically, virgin fire territory; there hasn’t been a fire in that area in a long time so there is a fuel density, low humidity, and high temperature equation that is allowing this fire to burn hot and bright. It’s an active fire during the day and night (it’s not really laying down after dark).

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There’s a Dam Fire In the Angeles National Forest Area North Of Azusa

Okay, it’s actually called the “Dam Fire.” And while wildfires are NEVER a laughing matter, the names they give some of them are kind of silly. (In case you didn’t know, most wildfires are named after their origin point – in this instance, that’d be near Morris Dam, San Gabriel Canyon).

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Applicants Wanted for U.S. Forest Service Wildfire Training Camp Designed for Women

The U.S. Forest Service is looking for a few great women! According to the Angeles National Forest website, USFS fire management officials are actively searching for thirty female candidates for the Fourth Annual Women-in-Wildfire Basic Training Camp 2020 edition. This is a great opportunity to get trained for entry-level wildland firefighter jobs that are available throughout California specifically for women.

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Why do California drivers rarely give signal when changing lanes?

This question was posed to me, and the answer is pretty simple: People in California very often do use their turn signals.

In California, though, the turn signal is a challenge. It has nothing to do with being inconsiderate or laziness. It’s a peacock showing colors, or a baboon showing it’s big colorful butt. It’s an aggressive challenge to the person in the next lane: “go ahead, try to stop me.” The driver in the next lane can either submit to the dominance displayed by the signaling driver, or issue a formal challenge in the form of acceleration.

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