Jun 08

Question: Do you think that novelists can write about what they don’t know?

Answer: Nope. If you write what you don’t know it rings false, and that transfers directly to the page, and the reader will always pick up on it.

To correct some misconceptions:

  • How many submarines did Jules Verne ride in? None. But he was intimately familiar with the French submarine experimenters of the time – including the submarine “Le Plongeur” designed and built by Simon Bourgeois and Charles Brun, which (gee, coincidentally enough…) just happened to be around for seven years before 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea was published, and which Verne actually saw when he was writing the story.
  • Fiction isn’t about “what you don’t know” at all. It’s about storytelling. Good storytellers write what they know. They always have, they always will.
  • Those who claim you should write what you don’t know – using the “crusading knights” and “dragons” and “space travel” and all the Hogwarts stuff doesn’t exist argument – clearly don’t understand storytelling. A story isn’t about the inner workings of hyperdrive, the quantum physics of a witch’s spell, the anatomy of a dragon or any of that ancillary ‘color.’ A good story is about heroes and villains and love and hate and human emotion. THAT is what good storytellers always write about; they write what they know.

Read the rest of this entry »

Jun 07

What does NaNoWriMo mean to me?

 

This morning I received an email soliciting funds from NaNoWriMo. 

NaNoWriMo was an annual writing challenge that took place every November. As it’s popularity has grown, it’s created NaNoWriMo, Camp NaNoWriMo and other annual, Internet-based creative writing contests that takes place throughout the year. The challenge is to a novel (50,000 words is the minimum length of a novel( between a scheduled start date and end date. The winner (anyone who writes the minimum number of words) gets an internet badge they can put on their website or facebook page or whatever. I have several on my site here, as I have often participated, supported, and won the challenges.

Read the rest of this entry »

May 21

Comments needed on Antiquities Act review

From John Stewart, Cal4Wheel Natural Resources Consultant:

The Department of Interior is taking public comments concerning its review of the Antiquities Act of 1906 and National Monuments created under this Act. BlueRibbon Coalition has made it very easy to submit comments. Go HERE

A review of National Monuments and the process to create them is long overdue. The Trump Administration has made it a reality. We must take advantage of the opportunity to affect the changes we want. Everyone who has an issue with National Monuments needs to weigh in on this. This action requires no money and no special expertise – just a couple of minutes of your time.

If this process comes back with nothing but opposition from environmental and preservationist interests, then we basically lose. This is put up or shut up time. Go out there and get everyone that you know to comment.

Read the rest of this entry »

Apr 27

California State Parks Seeks Public Input on a Road and Trail Management Plan for Humboldt Redwoods State Park

Weott, Calif. — California State Parks will hold an open house meeting to solicit comments on a draft road and trail management plan (RTMP) for Humboldt Redwoods State Park. The RTMP describes the existing roads and trails of the state park and provides specific direction for management and operations in the future. The goal of the plan is to enhance recreational trail opportunities, while protecting the park’s cultural and natural resources.
The open house meeting will be held on Tuesday, May 16 from 6 to 8 p.m. at the River Lodge Conference Center located at 1800 Riverwalk Drive, Fortuna. The draft plan can be viewed online at www.parks.ca.gov/HRSP-RTMP or be reviewed in person at the following locations:

  • North Coast Redwoods District Headquarters, 3431 Fort Ave, Eureka
  • Humboldt Redwoods State Park Visitor Center, 17119 Avenue of the Giants, Weott
  • California State Parks Facility Management Division, 704 O Street, Sacramento
  • Humboldt County Library Branches:

Eureka Main Library, 1313 3rd Street, Eureka

Arcata Library, 500 7th Street, Arcata

Fortuna Library, 753 14th Street, Fortuna

Garberville Library, 715 Cedar Street, Garberville

Read the rest of this entry »

Apr 03

Yosemite Conservancy launches KeepBearsWild.org

In partnership with the National Park Service and Wharton Media, the Yosemite Conservancy has launched KeepBearsWild.org, a website designed to help educate Yosemite National Park visitors about the black bears that live in the park.

The website has an online bear tracker, information to educate the public on what to do when they encounter bears, how to view bears in the wild, how to properly store food, photography and videos on the parks iconic black bears.

“KeepBearsWild.org is an important way to raise awareness, appreciation and respect for Yosemite’s beloved black bears,” said Yosemite National Park Acting Superintendent Chip Jenkins. “Our message is simple: everyone can keep bears wild by driving slowly, storing food properly and staying at a safe distance when you see them.”

Read the rest of this entry »

Mar 30

Thousands Visit California State Parks for Wildflower Season

Visitors Reminded to Plan and Be Prepared for the Outdoors

California State Parks News Release, Borrego Springs – California Department of Parks and Recreation encourages visitors exploring state parks during the wildflower season to properly plan and prepare for their trips. Thanks to this year’s rain, many state parks are experiencing wildflower blooms.

This is especially the case at the 650,000 acre Anza-Borrego (Anza-Borrego) Desert State Park which is experiencing the most dramatic bloom in nearly 20 years. With the flowers, come the large crowds. Knowledge of the area, weather, limitations of your body and enjoying the outdoors safely with everyone can help to ensure an enjoyable trip.

Below is some helpful information for wildflower enthusiasts:

Read the rest of this entry »

Mar 28

Devils Postpile Campground Update for 2017

Due to winter storm and flood damage and prioritization of trail repairs including Rainbow Falls, the monument’s 20 site campground is not anticipated to reopen in 2017. We regret any inconvenience, but this delay will allow the park to ensure the safety of our visitors and necessary preservation/restoration of the park’s natural resources impacted by the storm.

However, within the Reds Meadow Valley, there are another 128 first-come, first-served campsites we encourage visitors to consider visiting. The Minaret Vista Station provides site availability information before you enter the Reds Meadow Valley.

Established in 1911 by presidential proclamation, Devils Postpile National Monument protects and preserves the Devils Postpile formation, the 101-foot high Rainbow Falls, and pristine mountain scenery. The formation is a rare sight in the geologic world and ranks as one of the world’s finest examples of columnar basalt. Its columns tower 60 feet high and display an unusual symmetry.

Older posts «